• poor person: help i need money
  • rich person: why dont you sell your computer
  • poor person: firstly you act as if someone is guaranteed to buy my computer. i can put it on ebay or amazon or craigslist but i'm not guaranteed to get someone who wants it and stores often dont want used shit unless they give me a shitty price for it.
  • poor person: secondly computers have become a necessity rather than a luxury and you're lying to yourself severely if you say that it hasn't considering how virtually everything has to be done online nowadays from paying bills to applying for jobs.
  • poor person: thirdly did you know that selling my computer will not solve all of my problems it will only put about $80 - $250 into my pocket considering it's fucking used its not like i'm going to suddenly gain a steady flow of income upon selling my computer but yeah keep that smug look on your face as if "sell ur computer then" was some ingenious idea that i've never fucking thought of before
importantbirds:


thought was duck birbs But was actual a babby geese?? like to eat a hanbs and catch beesbuzz OUT OF A AIR!

ELEITE GRABBLER OF SMALLBUZZ giveem the HAND of applause this TRAIN FOR the business whole life (month of one) and now know a skill of: karates, backflip, and know ever word to Heart of Go On

importantbirds:

thought was duck birbs But was actual a babby geese?? like to eat a hanbs and catch beesbuzz OUT OF A AIR!

ELEITE GRABBLER OF SMALLBUZZ giveem the HAND of applause this TRAIN FOR the business whole life (month of one) and now know a skill of: karates, backflip, and know ever word to Heart of Go On

the-werefox:

do you ever get cuddle frustrated? Not sexually frustrated, but just get really frustrated and asdfghklg because you’re not cuddling someone right now and you just really need to feel someone with their arms around you and bury your face in their neck and just feel them close

descentintotyranny:

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can’t let them make up the rules
Innocent people’s lives are being ruined. Why isn’t anyone watching the watchlist?
Aug. 30 2014
The US government’s web of surveillance is vast and interconnected. Now we know just how opaque, inefficient and discriminatory it can be.
As we were reminded again just this week, you can be pulled into the National Security Agency’s database quietly and quickly, and the consequences can be long and enduring. Through ICREACH, a Google-style search engine created for the intelligence community, the NSA provides data on private communications to 23 government agencies. More than 1,000 analysts had access to that information.
This kind of data sharing, however, isn’t limited to the latest from Edward Snowden’s NSA files. It was confirmed earlier this month that the FBI shares its master watchlist, the Terrorist Screening Database, with at least 22 foreign governments, countless federal agencies, state and local law enforcement, plus private contractors.
The watchlist tracks “known” and “suspected” terrorists and includes both foreigners and Americans. It’s also based on loose standards and secret evidence, which ensnares innocent people. Indeed, the standards are so low that the US government’s guidelines specifically allow for a single, uncorroborated source of information – including a Facebook or Twitter post – to serve as the basis for placing you on its master watchlist.
Of the 680,000 individuals on that FBI master list, roughly 40% have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation”, according to the Intercept. These individuals don’t even have a connection – as the government loosely defines it – to a designated terrorist group, but they are still branded as suspected terrorists.
The absurdities don’t end there. Take Dearborn, Michigan, a city with a population under 100,000 that is known for its large Arab American community – and has more watchlisted residents than any other city in America except New York.
These eye-popping numbers are largely the result of the US government’s use of a loose standard – so-called “reasonable suspicion” – in determining who, exactly, can be watchlisted.
Read More

descentintotyranny:

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can’t let them make up the rules

Innocent people’s lives are being ruined. Why isn’t anyone watching the watchlist?

Aug. 30 2014

The US government’s web of surveillance is vast and interconnected. Now we know just how opaque, inefficient and discriminatory it can be.

As we were reminded again just this week, you can be pulled into the National Security Agency’s database quietly and quickly, and the consequences can be long and enduring. Through ICREACH, a Google-style search engine created for the intelligence community, the NSA provides data on private communications to 23 government agencies. More than 1,000 analysts had access to that information.

This kind of data sharing, however, isn’t limited to the latest from Edward Snowden’s NSA files. It was confirmed earlier this month that the FBI shares its master watchlist, the Terrorist Screening Database, with at least 22 foreign governments, countless federal agencies, state and local law enforcement, plus private contractors.

The watchlist tracks “known” and “suspected” terrorists and includes both foreigners and Americans. It’s also based on loose standards and secret evidence, which ensnares innocent people. Indeed, the standards are so low that the US government’s guidelines specifically allow for a single, uncorroborated source of information – including a Facebook or Twitter post – to serve as the basis for placing you on its master watchlist.

Of the 680,000 individuals on that FBI master list, roughly 40% have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation”, according to the Intercept. These individuals don’t even have a connection – as the government loosely defines it – to a designated terrorist group, but they are still branded as suspected terrorists.

The absurdities don’t end there. Take Dearborn, Michigan, a city with a population under 100,000 that is known for its large Arab American community – and has more watchlisted residents than any other city in America except New York.

These eye-popping numbers are largely the result of the US government’s use of a loose standard – so-called “reasonable suspicion” – in determining who, exactly, can be watchlisted.

Read More

Five Nights at Freddy's Song

livingtombstone:

Lyrics: 

Verse 1:

We’re waiting every night

to finally roam and invite

newcomers to play with us

for many years we’ve been all alone

We’re forced to be still and play

The same songs we’ve known since that day

An imposter took our life away

Now we’re stuck here to decay

Pre-Chorus:

Please let us get in!

don’t lock us away!

We’re not like what you’re thinking

We’re poor little souls

who have lost all control

and we’re forced here to take that role

We’ve been all alone

Stuck in our little zone

Since 1987

Join us, be our friend

or just be stuck and defend

after all you only got

Chorus: x2

Five Nights at Freddy’s

Is this where you want to be

I just don’t get it

Why do you want to stay

Verse 2:

We’re really quite surprised

We get to see you another night

You should have looked for another job

you should have said to this place good-bye

It’s like there’s so much more

Maybe you’ve been in this place before

We remember a face like yours

You seem acquainted with those doors

-Pre-Chorus

-Chorus